• Online Resources

    National Association of Special Education Teachers
    National Education Association
    Council for Exceptional Children
    LD Online
    Disability Info.Gov
    Special Olympics Oregon
    Intervention Central
    Stop Bullying Now!

    Kidsclick
    www.kidsclick.org

    Teaching Every Student
    www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/

    Mind 42
    www.mind42.com

    Freeology
    www.freeology.com/
    Tons of graphic organizers.

    Family and Community Together
    factoregon.org/
    Empowering Oregon families experiencing disability.

    Child Disability Connection (Swindell Resource Center)
    http://childdisabilityconnection.org/

    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
    http://www.jan.wvu.edu/links/adalinks.htm
    Contains the full text of the ADA Statute, the Accessibility Guidelines, and other Assistance Documents.
     
    Autism Society of Oregon (ASO)*
    http://autismsocietyoregon.org/

    The state chapter of the Autism Society of America (ASA,) which is the oldest and largest grassroots organization within the autism community. Autism Society of Oregon (ASO) seeks to empower individuals with autism, their families, and their service providers to improve the quality of their lives through support and information.
    * FACT Coalition member organization.
     
    Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities

    http://ucedd.uoregon.edu/
    One of two University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service (UCEDD) that works with people with disabilities, members of their families, state and local government agencies, and community provders in projects that provide training, technical assistance, service, research, and information sharing, with a focus on building the capacity of communities to sustain all their citizens. The Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities is located at the University of Oregon, College of Education in Eugene, OR.

    Disability Compass

    http://www.disabilitycompass.org/
    Disability Compass is an interactive web-based resource center, developed in Oregon, providing local community and national information on services, products, and special health care resources for people with disabilities, their families, and their supporters. Please visit this site to further search for links to resources within Oregon communities, statewide, and abroad.
    The Compass Cool Find, features a technology item once a month through audiovideo formatting.

    Family Center on Technology and Disability (FCTD)

    http://www.fctd.info
    A national resource center, operating entirely through program support from the US Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), FCTD supports organizations and programs that work with families of children and youth with disabilities, offering a range of information and services on the subject of assistive technology.

    Oregon Administrative Rules

    http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/banners/rules.htm
    ORS 183.310(9) defines "rule" as "any agency directive, standard, regulation or statement of general applicability that implements, interprets or prescribes law or policy, or describes the procedure or practice requirements of any agency." The Oregon Administrative Rules are published by the Oregon Secretary of State.
    State regulations pertaining to special education can be found beginning at Oregon Administrative Rules, OAR Chapter 581: www.sos.state.or.us/archives/rules/OARS_500/OAR_581/581_tofc.html

    Oregon Department of Education

    http://www.ode.state.or.us/
    Website for Oregon's Department of Education. Special Education is found under the Office of Student Learning and Partnerships.

    Oregon Department of Human Services, Developmental Disabilities Services

    http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/dd
    Case management (service coordination) and other services are available for children and adults in Oregon eligible as developmentally disabled. Check the phone book under county listings for your local office.

    Oregon Department of Human Services, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS)

    http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/vr
    Provides employment evaluations, training and other work related services to eligible persons with disabilities in the state of Oregon. Check your phone book under state listings for your local branch office

    The Arc of Oregon*

    http://www.arcoregon.org
    A statewide membership organization of more than 2000 individuals, working together to create a better tomorrow for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and their families. The Arc of Oregon advocates for the rights and full community participation of all children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
    * FACT Coalition member organization

    Transition Community Network

    http://www.tcntransition.org
    A wealth of resources are available for high school students, parents, teachers, administrators, potential and current employers, and professionals in agencies that provide services to students with disabilities.  The site was developed to quickly link people to transition-related information in Oregon.
    For information and resources related to post-school outcomes, Oregon diploma options, updates, and requirements go to Post-School Outcomes--Transition Reference Booklet.

    Family Resources

    Ability Awareness is Action
    Family Support Groups
    Tax Exemption Notification for Parents of Special Needs Children
    Special Olympics Flyer

    Parent Resources

    Autism Society of Oregon
    Autism Society of Oregon (ASO)*http://www.oregonautism.com/
    The state chapter of the Autism Society of America (ASA,) which is the oldest and largest grassroots organization within the autism community. Autism Society of Oregon (ASO) seeks to empower individuals with autism, their families, and their service providers to improve the quality of their lives through support and information.
    * FACT Coalition member organization.
     
    Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities
    http://ucedd.uoregon.edu/
    One of two University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service (UCEDD) that works with people with disabilities, members of their families, state and local government agencies, and community provders in projects that provide training, technical assistance, service, research, and information sharing, with a focus on building the capacity of communities to sustain all their citizens. The Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities is located at the University of Oregon, College of Education in Eugene, OR.
     
    Disability Compass
    http://www.disabilitycompass.org/
    Disability Compass is an interactive web-based resource center, developed in Oregon, providing local community and national information on services, products, and special health care resources for people with disabilities, their families, and their supporters. Please visit this site to further search for links to resources within Oregon communities, statewide, and abroad.
    The Compass Cool Find, features a technology item once a month through audiovideo formatting.
    Family Center on Technology and Disability (FCTD)
    http://www.fctd.info
    A national resource center, operating entirely through program support from the US Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), FCTD supports organizations and programs that work with families of children and youth with disabilities, offering a range of information and services on the subject of assistive technology.
     
    Family Support Center on Disabilities—Knowledge & Involvement Network (KIN)
    http://www.familysupportclearinghouse.org/Pages/Home.aspx
    A project funded by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, that offers a centralized resource on the full range of options available to individuals with disabilities and their families, nationwide.  Included are organizations, general disability resources, state-specific information, family forums, and personal stories.
     
    Juntos Podemos
    http://www.juntos-podemos.org
    A center for Latino families who have a child with developmental disabilities.
     
    Oregon Administrative Rules
    http://arcweb.sos.state.or.us/banners/rules.htm
    ORS 183.310(9) defines "rule" as "any agency directive, standard, regulation or statement of general applicability that implements, interprets or prescribes law or policy, or describes the procedure or practice requirements of any agency." The Oregon Administrative Rules are published by the Oregon Secretary of State.
    State regulations pertaining to special education can be found beginning at Oregon Administrative Rules, OAR Chapter 581: www.sos.state.or.us/archives/rules/OARS_500/OAR_581/581_tofc.html
     
    Oregon Department of Education
    http://www.ode.state.or.us/
    Website for Oregon's Department of Education. Special Education is found under the Office of Student Learning and Partnerships.
    Go to Oregon Tax Exemptionto download document produced by the Oregon Department of Education on information concerning the Oregon tax exemption for parents of children with disabilities for calendar year ending December 31, 2009.
     
    Oregon Department of Human Services, Developmental Disabilities Services
    http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/dd
    Case management (service coordination) and other services are available for children and adults in Oregon eligible as developmentally disabled. Check the phone book under county listings for your local office.
     
    Oregon Department of Human Services, Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS)
    http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/vr
    Provides employment evaluations, training and other work related services to eligible persons with disabilities in the state of Oregon. Check your phone book under state listings for your local branch office
     
    Oregon Parent Training and Information Center (OrPTI)*
    http://www.orpti.org
    The statewide parent training and information center serving parents of children with disabilities. Their goal is to educate and support parents, families, and professionals in building partnerships that meet the needs of children and youth with the full range of disabilities ages birth to 26.
    * FACT Coalition member organization.
    The Arc of Oregon*
    http://www.arcoregon.org
    A statewide membership organization of more than 2000 individuals, working together to create a better tomorrow for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and their families. The Arc of Oregon advocates for the rights and full community participation of all children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
    * FACT Coalition member organization
    Transition Community Network
    http://www.tcntransition.org
    A wealth of resources are available for high school students, parents, teachers, administrators, potential and current employers, and professionals in agencies that provide services to students with disabilities.  The site was developed to quickly link people to transition-related information in Oregon.
    For information and resources related to post-school outcomes, Oregon diploma options, updates, and requirements go to Post-School Outcomes--Transition Reference Booklet.

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
    www.nichcy.org

    Internet Public Library
    www.ipl.org

    Kidsclick
    www.kidsclick.org

    Mind 42
    www.mind42.com

    Freeology
    www.freeology.com/graphicorgs/
    Tons of graphic organizers.

    Oregon Parent Training and Information Center (OrPTI)
    http://www.orpti.org/whatisorpti.html

    The statewide parent training and information center serving parents of children with disabilities. Their goal is to educate and support parents, families, and professionals in building partnerships that meet the needs of children and youth with the full range of disabilities ages birth to 26.

    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)
    http://www.jan.wvu.edu/links/adalinks.htm
    Contains the full text of the ADA Statute, the Accessibility Guidelines, and other Assistance Documents.

  • Accommodations Bank

    Accommodations are changes to the environment that change how a student learns material. Accommodations can help students learn the same material and meet the same expectations as their classmates without changing the core content of the curriculum.

    This accommodation bank is the core of Medford's accommodations for students with IEPs. While this was designed specifically for students with IEPs, any teacher can use these accommodations as best practice for all learners.

    The accommodations are organized by lagging skill. To search for an accommodation and a corresponding training link, search by a student's lagging skill.

    ABILITY TO ATTEND

    Advance Organizers: Teacher gives a quick overview of the activities planned for the instructional period or day, either in verbal, visual, or written format, to provide students with a mental schedule of the learning activities, how those activities interrelate, important materials needed for specific activities, and the amount of time set aside for each activity. Students who are inattentive benefit from this overview of learning activities, as the advance organizer can prompt, mentally prepare, and focus these students on learning.

    Elementary Advanced Organizers (start video at 3:00 minutes)

    Secondary Advanced Organizers

    Visual Supports for Older Students (Advanced Organizers/Break tasks into small steps)

    Break Tasks into Small Steps: Teacher chunks student's assignment by physically covering part of the assignment, folding the assignment, or choosing part of the assignment to complete, such as numbers 1-5. This will allow student to feel less overwhelmed about the amount of work that must be completed.

    Capture Student’s Attention before Giving Directions: Teacher should gain the student's attention before giving directions and use other strategies to ensure the student's full understanding. For example, when giving directions to an individual student, call the student by name and establish eye contact before providing the directions. After giving whole-group directions, privately approach the student, quietly restate the directions, and have her/him repeat the directions back as a check for understanding.

    Employ Proximity Control: Students typically increase their attention to task and show improved compliance when the teacher is in close physical proximity. For example, during whole-group activities circulate around the room to keep students focused. To hold an individual student's attention, stand or sit near the student before giving directions or engaging in discussion.

    Frequent Reminders of the Importance of Goals and Task Completion: Some students require periodic or persistent reminders of the goal or task toward which s/he is working and the value or purpose it serves for that student. A student may need support in maintaining a consistent vision of the reward of reaching the goal or finishing the task at hand. For example, the teacher may write the overall goal on the board or on a card that the student may keep at their desk. The teacher may also need to do a check-in with the student, either hourly, daily, or weekly, dependent on the size of the overall goal, level of student attention, and motivation.

    Monitor and Adjust for Student Attention/Frustration: Students will vary in their skill level, abilities, and level of challenge s/he can withstand in the classroom setting. The teacher should be prepared to offer varied levels and types of demands and appropriate resources for the student to meet those demands. When the teacher offers a range of demands and resources, all students will be able to find an appropriate level of challenge for themselves. For example, the teacher will consult with a student when s/he is becoming frustrated about an assignment.

    Offer Choices to Demonstrate Knowledge: Teacher offers choices to student to demonstrate proficiency toward objectives or learning targets. For example, the teacher may develop a rubric for a unit, offering the student a variety of projects to demonstrate understanding, such as writing a song, creating a diorama, crafting a paper, or giving an oral presentation. It is important to note that individual students will differ in how much and what kind of choices they prefer to have. Teachers must determine the right kinds of choice and level of independence for individual students.

    Preferential Seating: Preferential seating simply means the student is in a location where s/he is most likely to stay focused on instruction. All teachers have an “action zone,” the part of the room where most of the instruction is focused. After analyzing the “action zone,” the teacher will place the student's seat somewhere within that zone. The ideal seating location for any particular student will vary, depending on the unique qualities of the target student and the classroom. When selecting preferential seating, consider whether the student might be self-conscious sitting directly next to the teacher. Try to select a seat location that avoids other distractions, such as a seat by a window or next to a talkative classmate.

    Provide Options for Increasing Student Interest and Engagement: Teachers must have multiple ways to increase student interest and engagement. For example, the teacher may use different techniques to pique a student’s interest, such as through small group or partner work, preferred topics interwoven into daily instruction, or classroom duties assigned and rotated amongst students.

    Kindergarten Example 

    5th Grade Example 

    Middle School Example 

    Middle School Example

    Provide Options for Sustaining Effort and Persistence: Teacher will train the student to self-regulate their effort and persistence in order to learn new skills and strategies. When motivated, many students can learn to regulate their effort and persistence. For example, the teacher may provide the student with a cue, such as a specific word or phrase that will serve as a reminder to her/him about effort level. Teach the student to use a checklist of daily tasks to maintain persistence, or provide a timer for self-checks on attention and focus.

    Self-Assessment

    Provide Quiet Work Area: Teacher will provide a quieter location in the classroom when student has more difficult assignments to complete. For example, a desk or study carrel in an area away from the large group may serve as an appropriate workspace. When introducing these workspaces to students, stress that the quiet locations are intended to help students to concentrate. Never use areas designated for quiet work as punitive time-out spaces, as students will learn to avoid them. Use headphones, earbuds, or earplugs to reduce noise distractions.

    Provide Scheduled Attention Break: Teacher creates a plan with the student to give her/him short breaks to engage in a preferred activity each time s/he has completed a pre-designated amount of work. For example, a student may be allowed to look at a favorite comic book for two minutes each time that s/he has completed five problems on a math worksheet and checked the answers. Attention breaks can refresh the student, as well as make the learning task more reinforcing.

    Reinforce On-Task Behavior: Teacher will reinforce the student when demonstrating on-task behavior. For example, the teacher may praise the student verbally when s/he is working or assign points following a reward system. Praise should be sincere, explicit in what the student is doing well, and immediate to the on-task behavior. Teacher may wish to consult with special education staff to develop a list of reinforcers particular to a specific student.

    Example #1

    Example #2

    Seat Near Instruction: Student's desk/seat is in the front of the room or near the teacher's most frequently used teaching area. Teacher may need to predetermine the area of the classroom where most of the instruction will occur. Teacher may allow student to move to be closer to instruction when instruction moves from the main location.

    Small Group Setting/Instruction: Student will have access to small group setting and/or instruction. A small group setting varies in number, but is smaller in size than the general education setting. Based on the small group, a student may typically receive instruction in a group of three to five students, which allow the student to attend to the instruction better than in a large group setting.

    Elementary Example

    Teacher Explanation of Small Group Instruction

    Academics

    Access to charts, math tools:  Student provided or allowed to use manipulatives (blocks, cubes, etc.), tools (calculator, ruler, protractor, etc.), and charts (hundreds chart, multiplication chart, fractions chart, etc.) during math instruction.

    Advance Organizer:  Teacher will provide student with an advance organizer prior to lecture or instruction to clearly capture concepts taught. The teacher may choose to provide an outline directly to the student, write key concepts on the board, or provide a copy of the material to be presented. The teacher should refer to each topic as it is presented to assist the student in tracking the information.

    Audio Books or Textbooks:  Student allowed to listen to story, book, or textbook.

    Dictate to Scribe:  Student allowed to tell an approved scribe information/answers, and the scribe will write or type what is dictated verbatim. Staff member should avoid prompting student for additional information or suggesting corrections.

    Differentiation in the Classroom/Co-Teaching Model

    Frequent Adult Assistance:  Regular/consistent help from a staff member with understanding/completing assignments.

    Frequent Checks for UnderstandingTeacher regularly checks with student to verify her/his understanding of the directions or assignment. Individual students may require a different frequency of check-ins, so teacher will need to be flexible based on student need and comprehension.

    Letter Line on Desk:  Teacher provides student with a letter line on her/his desk.

    Materials Matched to Student's Skill Levels:  Teacher assigns appropriate assignment to student based on student's current instructional and/or independent skill level. Teacher may determine skill level based on formative or summative assessments or through collaboration with special education staff.

    Model Tasks and Expectations:  Teacher will provide a visual demonstration of tasks and expectations before student attempts the task. For example, the teacher may show the student how to complete a math problem using the calculator before asking the student to do a series of problems.

    Number line on desk:  Teacher provides student a number line on her/his desk to assist with basic counting, adding, subtracting, comparing, and ordering tasks.

    Read Assignments to Student:  Teacher reads directions, story, or problems on assignment to student.

    Reinforce Correct Responses Immediately: Teacher will reinforce correct responses immediately. For example, a student who is hesitant to complete work in class for fear of being incorrect may experience a boost in self-confidence when the teacher acknowledges the correct response.

    Repetition to Mastery:  Student will have the opportunity to practice a skill repeatedly until s/he has mastered the learning target. For example, a student may need to practice the skill of double-digit multiplication a day or two longer than her/his peers. The student will have the opportunity to master the skill before being asked to move on to a more advanced level of multiplication.

    Space to Move, Stand, Wiggle:  Student allowed to stand or move around a little in order to focus on assignment. For example, student may stand behind their seat or at a pre-designated location in the classroom.

    Shortened Assignments:  Teacher minimizes the number/amount of an assignment student is expected to complete to demonstrate proficiency. Teacher may select a specific task, i.e. multiplication problems only on a mixed math worksheet or problems 1-10 instead of 1-20.

    Speech-to-Text:  Student will have access to speech-to-text software that will allow student to verbally state their thoughts and ideas and have them recorded on the computer. Students who struggle with the physical or processing aspects of written language tasks will be supported by the use of speech-to-text software.

    Spell Checker:  Student allowed to use spell checker when completing an assignment that requires writing. Spell checker may be hand-held or on a tablet or computer.

    Spelling Dictionary:  Student allowed to use spelling dictionary when completing an assignment that requires writing.

    Structured Learning Environment:  Components of a structured learning environment include consistent expectations, predictable classroom procedures and routines, developmentally appropriate instruction and use of language, precise behavior management system, proactive interventions, replacement skills training, and independent learning and social skills training, flexibility and adaptability training.

    Text-to-Speech:  Student will have access to text-to-speech software which allow the reading material to electronically be read to the student. Students who struggle with reading may access text-to-speech software to support comprehension of the text. Teacher should continue to focus on the skill of reading while using text-to-speech software.

    Time Limits for Task Completion:  Teacher assigns a time limit to work on task/assignment and accepts assignment when time limit is reached regardless of how much has been completed. For example, the student may have only completed 10 out of 15 problems. The teacher should grade the assignment based on the 10 problems completed and not decrease the student’s grade based on the 5 unanswered problems.

    Title 1 Support:  Student will have access to Title 1 support. Title 1 support is available to schools that have a large population of low-income students to help ensure that all children meet state academic standards.

     

    Self-Regulation

    Allow Fidget or Calming Tool: Teacher will monitor student’s use of a fidget or calming tool to assist in self-regulation of behavior and provide sensory input to self-calm. For example, the teacher may allow student to manipulate pipe cleaners, squeeze a squishy ball, or place their fingers on Velcro placed under their desk.

    Allow Movement Breaks: Teacher schedules movement activities at a pre-designated amount of time dependent on student need. For example, a student may need to move every 15-30 minutes in order to maintain focus, so the teacher may prompt student to get a drink of water or may direct all students to stand up and stretch.

    Break Cards: Teacher will allow student to use “take-a-break” card to access breaks when student is agitated, frustrated, or overwhelmed. Teacher will train student in expectations of using the break card. For example, the teacher and student may create a plan that will allow the student to use the break card to access the designated space, take deep breaths, think of a happy thought, and return to the desk. Each plan will vary dependent on student need. Teacher may wish to seek assistance from special education staff in creating the “take-a-break” plan.

    Calming Space: Teacher will allow student access to a calming space when the student is frustrated or agitated. Teacher will work with student beforehand to set the rules of use for the calming space. For example, the teacher may train the student that when s/he is frustrated, s/he may go to a special chair in the classroom and look at a book until s/he is calm enough to return to the activity.

    Check-In/Check-Out System: Teacher(s) will use a check-in/check-out system with student. A check-in/check-out system details a student’s behavior in the classroom and across school settings throughout the day, teaching the student to become responsible for managing her/his own behaviors. For example, a student may check-in with a teacher at the beginning of the day, get a check-in card for the day for other staff to document behavior, and then check-out with the original teacher at the end of the day. Check-in/check-out systems may include home/school communication.

    Collaborative Problem Solving: Teachers who have been trained in Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS) will engage students in defining a problem and possible solutions that work for both the student and the teacher. For example, a teacher may use CPS to discover why a student repeatedly leaves class when the teacher transitions from math to reading instruction. The teacher may discover the student’s concern with this transition is vastly different than her/his perception of the problem and be able to adapt the transition to allow the student to maintain presence in the classroom.

    Home/School Communication System: Teacher will use a pre-determined communication system to notify student’s family of behavior improvements and areas of concern. For example, the teacher may use a daily checklist to notify family of a student’s behavior or may write a weekly email to update family on progress. Teacher may wish to seek assistance from special education staff to develop a system.

    Provide Heavy Work Chores: Teacher may assign student to heavy work chores that will allow the student some down time, as well as deep pressure input to promote calming. For example, the teacher may have the student carry a crate of books to the library when the teacher notices the student is becoming agitated. Teacher may wish to seek assistance from special education staff to develop a list of possible work chores and discuss how to recognize when the student may need to be assigned a chore.

    Reward System: Teacher implements system that will allow student to earn privileges for reaching set goals. For example, the teacher may create a system that rewards the student with two minutes of free choice time for every five math problems completed or ten minutes on the computer at the end of the day when no behavior referrals were required to manage student behavior.

    Teach and Reinforce Coping Skills Strategies: Teacher will provide strategies for student to manage and direct their emotional response to external and internal stimuli. For example, the teacher may implement reminders, models, and/or checklists to assist student in coping with social settings or strategies to avoid perseverating on depressive thoughts. Teacher should provide sufficient alternatives to meet individual student needs. Teacher may wish to seek assistance from special education staff to create a list of alternatives.

    Worry

    Anger

    Stress

    Teach and Reinforce Self-Regulation Strategies: Teacher will provide strategies for student to manage their self-regulation. For example, the teacher may implement reminders, models, and/or checklists to assist student in self-regulating when confronted with change. Teacher should provide sufficient alternatives to meet individual student needs. Teacher may wish to seek assistance from special education staff to create a list of alternatives.

    What & Why???

    5 Incredibly Fun Games to Teach Self-Regulation

    The Zones of Regulation

    An Introduction to Self-Regulated Learning

    Scaffolding Self-Regulated Learning in Primary Classrooms

     

  • Check out these upcoming trainings!

    Check back soon for the 2016-17 school year training schedule!